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NC Coastal News

2 weeks ago

Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines

From the archives, Orrin Pilkey and Rob Young moving the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse: ... See MoreSee Less

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1 month ago

Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines

www.facebook.com/CapeLookoutNPS/videos/1734848623202617/

Cape Lookout National Seashore
New overwash inlet on the northern end of South Core Banks in Cape Lookout National Seashore from coastal storm March 2018
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1 month ago

Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines

Awesome!

USGS Coastal and Ocean Science
Nor'Easter impacts in Sandwich, Massachusetts!

The USGS operated a beach cam at Sandwich Town Neck Beach, MA to monitor coastal change and provide ground truth for modelling efforts. The recent Nor’Easter March 2-4 was forecast to have major coastal impacts in this area. Water levels rose to record levels with a combination of spring tides, storm surge, and wave action. Water levels were about 1 meter above the spring high tide elevations. The damage from the slow-moving storm was extended over four high-tides, beginning Friday morning and extending into early Sunday morning. These images and the corresponding video demonstrate the power of this storm on the coastal area. #USGS #extremestorms #coastalchangehazards #sealevelrise #erosion #noreaster #townneckbeach #beachcam
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Beautiful video of NC 12 experiencing storm overwash. ... See MoreSee Less

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USGS Coastal and Ocean Science
Coastal and shoreline change related to storms and sea-level rise!

Dr. Erika Lentz, USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center research geologist, talks nor'easter impacts with Jim Cantore from The Weather Channel on Peggotty Beach in Scituate, Massachusetts.
#usgs #coastsalchange #erosion #sealevelrise #waves #winterstormriley #eyeofthestorm Weatherchannel #shorelinechange
Learn more about coastal landscape response to sea-level rise for the Northeastern United States woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/coastal_response/index.html
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1 month ago

Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines

SCOURING AT SOUTHERN END OF SCONSET SEAWALL

**Seawalls are shore parallel structures designed to protect property from coastal erosion. Any structure that is designed to combat storm erosion by reflecting waves and surge is effectively a seawall. If a line of geotubes (geotextile, sand filled tubes) remains in tact during storm wave attack, then the geotubes are acting like a seawall and will have identical impacts.

So, one must keep in mind that if a wall of geotubes works as designed, that wall will have the same impacts as a seawall.

1) When placed on an eroding or retreating beach or bluff, geotubes will cause that beach to narrow and eventually disappear.

2) Erosion will be increased at the ends of the wall, the so-called “end effect.” The end effect is the result of waves diffracting around the edges of the wall during storms or high water events. It results in a clear increase in erosion at the margins of the geotube wall.

3) The wall will eliminate the natural sediment supply that would come to the beach through erosion of the bluff behind the wall.**

Expert testimony submitted to the Conservation Commission in 2013 during the public hearing on the SBPF Notice of Intent to install the 900-foot seawall by Dr. Robert Young, Director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines. The science is clear and irrefutable: Hard armoring destroys beaches. This is one of the reasons the Conservation Commission declined to permit the geotube seawall which sits on a beach owned by the citizens of Nantucket. The decision of the ConCom was overruled by the State on appeal by SBPF.

— With thanks to Kindflow Productions for this photo taken yesterday at the southern return of the geotube seawall. #nantucket #beaches #savenantucketbeaches #erosionhappens #leaveperfectalone #ourbeachesneedus
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